Hake's Parables and Tales

Binding
Hake, Thomas Gordon, and Arthur Hughes (illus.), PARABLES AND TALES (London: Chapman & Hall, 1872).  First edition, 19 x 12.5cm (8vo), in publisher's forest green linen w/gilt ruling & circular device to fr. cover & gilt title to spine, a.e. untrimmed, [i-viii], [1] 2-98 pp. w/frontis & 8 full-page wood engravings by the Dalziels after Hughes, +6pp. publ. cat. to rear.  Printed at the Camden Press, London.  Binding Good (expertly rebacked w/most of the original spine laid down & hinges mended, extremities sl. rubbed, a couple of candlewax stains to fr. cover, & recto of rear ep. foxed); contents Good (recto of half-title & final page of adverts browned, & several edges patched w/rice paper).  White 171, Reid 92, Fredeman 48.6 & 93.33, Ray p.103 ("the decorated cover seems to be commoner than the plain cloth binding"--but he neglects to mention that the plain-bound issue, w/its untrimmed edges, is sl. larger in format), de Beaumont 123, Woodman pp.23-24 (offering firm evidence that the two bindings were issued simultaneously), Goldman 242; see also Ball 161.  (Inv. #805)  C$600

    In addition to the Rossetti-designed binding & the above plainer green binding w/central device to fr. cover, two other versions were issued: "A sufficient number of the sheets remained as late as October 1894 for a different publisher to reissue the volume in a plain green binding, with the Chapman title page, the same four pages of adverts, and a tipped-in printed sticker announcing that 'This book is now supplied by Elkin Mathews'" (Woodman p.23)--occasionally one finds copies missing the printed slip, leading to speculation as to whether they were publisher's oversights or the results of owners wishing to "enhance" their copies; and again in 1917 by Mathews in plain light blue cloth boards (Colbeck 3) but w/most of the original adverts replaced by newer ones & w/new prelims.  In Colbeck's entry he warned: "It would therefore appear that any rebound copy of Parables and Tales (1872) lacking the 2 final leaves of adverts must be suspect, as having derived from this late source."




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